Tips on how toPaint a Lovely looking Design on a Black Canvas Trolley suitcase

May 27th, 2019

A indice travel suitcase can quicken the time you’ll spend in the airport terminal and it could help alleviate problems with mix-ups during security and even check-in. It may also help you to find your bag on the carousel easily, perhaps even frustrating thieves. To keep the baggage protected, here are five ways for you to personalise your suitcases so it will be stick out from everyone else:

The step one during the process is to establish your design. Select a design which has a decent outside line maybe a cartoon character or just a collection of letters. My current design was a list of three pet cats on one side with a mouse on the back. After getting figured out your design, sketch or trace the outside lines of the design upon the dark-colored canvas with a graphite or vanishing yellow/white sewing pencil.

Paint in the lines with gesso or possibly a white fabric base paint. Allow this layer of paint to dry totally ahead of carrying on. Both gesso and fabric base paint take more time to dry compared to acrylic paint because of their thickness. The gesso or fabric base paint hardens and helps to create a covering that will accept a layer of colored paint by employing one simple layer. You’ll have to paint as many as 10 layers of light coloured paint on dark colored canvas to obtain the lightness of the paint to be noticed.

Once the gesso or white fabric base paint is dry, draw the inside lines of your design. Colour each area along with the right coloured acrylic or perhaps fabric paint. Allow the paint to dry totally before carrying on.

Add more any kind of detail you prefer at this stage such as covering, little styles like dots, circles, roses and so on. Shake glitters over the wet paint so as to add a further dimension once you want. After all small designs plus glitter are used, outline each area by using black paint. Try a liner brush to carry out the detailing. A liner brush holds the paint for a longer time and produces a longer line of paint over a tiny round brush.

Heat set the layout after the last drying. Place a brown piece of wrapping paper on the design area. Turn on your iron as well as heat on a cotton setting. Place the hot iron in the upper left hand place of the packaging paper and keep in place for Just a few seconds. Move the iron to the right one iron’s width and repeat. Go on shifting the iron and heating the painting until the whole spot have been heat set. Take off the brown packaging paper and you’re ready.

Original Resource: http://blog.cheapwallarts.com/

Colourful Paintings by Francoise Nielly

May 16th, 2019

In the personal way, Francoise Nielly paints a persons deal with in every one of his artwork. And she paints it over and over yet again, with slashes of color all over their encounter. Occasions of lifestyle that come up from her works of art are delivered from your clinch together with the fabric. Colour is introduced just like a projectile.

Because you can see the brush strokes, and the rough colour blocks, the piece of work looks rough textured. Its distinct to a lot of designers who clean out their clean cerebral vascular accidents, and who merge their hues. I really like the abstract result it presents.

She has discovered the many elements of “picture” all her existence, by way of piece of art, roughs, photography, illustrations and virtual, personal computer made cartoon images. It can be very clear since piece of art is her course and her interest.

Francoise Nielly’s artwork is expressive, demonstrating a brute pressure, an intriguing essential power. knife and Oil blend shape her graphics from your materials that may be , simultaneously, biting and sensual, incisive and carnal. Whether or not she paints your body or portraits, the musician requires a chance : her artwork is intimate, her shades free of charge,surprising and exuberant, even incredible, the lower of her blade incisive, her colour pallet stunning.

Its abstract with funky colours. That’s my first impressions on this piece of work. It displays dark areas in which more dark hues are, and lightweight where by lighter weight colors are. In my opinion its too colorful, however. I prefer just a few colours. Alternatively, just dark colours.

She will get her sensation of construction and space from her daddy, who has been an designer. Being raised from the To the south of France in which she resided among Saint and Cannes-Tropez, is rarely faraway from light, colour feeling as well as the environment that permeates the To the south of France. This really is in conjunction with her research together scientific studies in the Beaux artistry and Attractive Artistry, and her humorousness and also party.

Francoise Nielly life in the realm of pictures.

Françoise Nielly – artiste

Francoise Nielly technique

May 9th, 2019

Francoise draws lines to discover beauty, feelings, and focus of memories. All portrait signifies a sense of joy and unhappiness. Once we uncover these kind of sensuous, expressive and tremendous drawing, we understand that concentration can move significantly inside a look, in the body language, in the position which defines ones methods of being. The shades are what makes Nielly’s paintings so real and natural and is particularly not possible not to adore her subjects. Lots of could be inspirations, which dance inside these kind of feeling, and lots of could be the symbolism which might be conveyed. ?Have you questioned yourselves how valuable it can be to experience colorings? Or simply been curious about how important it is to control these kind of colorings?

Francoise Nielly is undoubtedly an artist seen as an complex and sophisticated skills showing charming and very important energy and strength.

Don’t you love Francoise Nielly’s artworks? Do you want to purchase a portrait painting made by this artist? I am not sure if Francoise take commission job? But when she do, i bet the charge should be super expensive as the majority of her paintings are selling $10,000 to $30,000. Thus, generally, it is nearly difficult to let Francoise Nielly create your portrait, but, you know what, our experienced artists can! We can easily paint your picture just like Francoise Nielly do!

In her own way, Francoise Nielly paints our face in each of his art. And she paints it over and over again, with slashes of paint via their face. Memories of personal life that occur from her artworks are produced from a clinch with the canvas. Color choice is revealed like a projectile.

Nielly shows you a protective analysis to hint and has become an instinctive and wild target of expression. If you close your eyes, you wouldn’t think a face, containing colors, however if you think about this very closely, everything gains a form via our hopes. The most distressed soul could have colors, that happen to be unseen but always alive. Many individuals consider that in a portrait, there is always a peace that goes out, but in my opinion, every message is imprinted in their face. Eyes find out sins and keenness, a grin opens peace or possibly a decisive lie, and dazzling colours indicate judgments without so much movement.

In Francoise Nielly’s paintings, she doesn’t use any modern technology and employs only oil francoise nielly mandela plus palette knife. The shades are spread roughly on the canvas turn out to be a really great work. Her portraits encapsulate potency of colors as if a fantastic means of experiencing life. The conception and form are just beginning factors.

Artworks by artisan Franoise Nielly have a very noticeable strength that emanate from each and every composition. Having improved palette knife portrait techniques, the painter utilizes huge strokes of oil on canvas to blend a clear abstraction in to these figurative portraits. The paintings, which can be based off simple white and black pictures, feature serious light, shadow, details, and productive neon shades. As stated by her biography on Behance, Nielly uses a risk: her portrait is sexual, her colorings free, contemporary, unusual, also powerful, the cut of her knife incisive, her shades pallete breathtaking.

Spectral figure

April 30th, 2019

To engage this spectral figure will require us to open ourselves to the effects of certain traits which I want to gather together under one word. And that word – whose introduction here will no doubt be troublesome to many – is “magic.” Something on the order of magic – unreal, phantasmic, hallucinatory, perhaps even diabolical – is released in these works. (As I see it, the term “magic” would ultimately refer to any psychic operation that would appear to reduce or eliminate the distinction between, for example, an ego and an other. Such an operation would, in effect, fall outside of any order of representation; it would, in a word, be unrepresentable. I realize that such an operation, if pursued, may require that we rethink certain principles fundamental to psychoanalysis, to our understanding of the subject in general.) Consequences notwithstanding, I must insist on employing the word if only because, in reconsidering the effects produced by Graham’s set-ups, I now better understand the significance of a remark made seventeen years ago by a professor of mine. Commenting on my work – an installation of mirrors titled Loci – he offered only this on-the-spot assessment: “It’s magic.” Without doubt, this judgment – “it’s magic” – left its mark, becoming for me, in time, something of a leitmotif. So, tonight, the word magic – think of it as a password or passkey – will, I trust, assist us in going a little further into these excessive and most redundant devices. Given my predilection, my fancy for the word, for all that overflows and exceeds the phenomenality of its sense, I will say that an event like Present Continuous Past(s) “presents” nothing less than an extravagant set of surface effects, a generalized simulacrum of presentation on which all movement, all transaction – yours and mine – are inscribed. You and I are, thus, one of its effects, an inscribed function if you like, part of the machinery of a complex sleight of hand production that is capable of proceeding – quite miraculously I assure you – without us. These events, if we can still call them events, repeat themselves. As soon as they are up and running, they divide and multiply themselves. They auto-partition themselves – and, at once, discount themselves as events.

Information about Outpost Art

NELAART 2010 Art Walk

Programa de residencia para artistas en Los Angeles

Indeed, as Pelzer astutely points out: “the video works consist of so many variations on partition,” that is, so many counter-points to a modernist orthodoxy which, she goes on to explain, has come to base its authority on a “unitary conception of space.” Now if you recall, I mentioned earlier a text by Jeff Wall, Dan Graham’s Kammerspiel, where, in speaking critically of the glass house (the Philip Johnson House in New Canaan, Connecticut), he resorts to what he refers to as its theoretical occupant. But why, in the middle of his analysis, must he rely on such a construct? Why, when it comes to a question of the house, must he invent something? Well you see, but I could be wrong on this, I doubt whether Wall has ever visited the house; he has never experienced, has never given himself – first hand – an experience of the house. Hence, a bit of speculation was called for, out of which arose, as if from the dead, his theoretical subject, his vampire – which, of course, is not a subject at all. Let us, instead, call it a figure, a figure of the imagination or the Imaginary, but – and I hope I have made this clear – a figure whose affects, insofar as we can experience them today through certain technologies of reproduction, are nevertheless real. Further on in Dan Graham’s Kammerspiel, Wall introduces such an affect, what he calls a coup d’oeil (a glance). This blow (a nocturnal coup de grace or finishing stroke) irrupts from the mirror — and, as you all know, the vampire’s image, his imago elides reflection since what is reflected, what is returned to it, is its own nothingness.

Many of Therrien’s sculptures

April 28th, 2019

Many of Therrien’s sculptures are polychromed and the use of a painted surface over a sculptural form (largely rejected by minimalist sculpture), if followed in one direction, leads back to traditional folk art and religious statuary, both of which relied on colour to heighten the emotionality of the experience and to enhance the viewer’s identification with the object through an augmented realism. The relationship between the level of identification sponsored by an artwork and its degree of realism is, however, a complex one. Both indices depend on and fluctuate with varying historical notions of verisimilitude. (Increasing the emotional register of a work through the use of colour may well be at the expense of verisimilitude.) What is finally at issue here is the relation between a work’s degree of realism and its degree of authenticity and how this relationship is regulated by shifting and evolving historical circumstances and tolerances. With regard to Therrien’s work, the importance of this discussion is in noting that his art attempts to maximize both the concreteness of the sculpture as object and its emotional potency and to balance these attributes.

A complex, symbiotic relationship between shape and colour, objecthood, fantasy, memory and feeling applies to Therrien’s objects. Some of the key images in his lexicon are snowmen, ovals, cones and clouds. These are motifs he returns to over and over again. The impulse to repeat, rework and recycle his motifs is a prominent aspect of his activity as an artist. These are basic and compelling general features of the work and they reflect on its privacy and psychology as well as on the work’s relation to other contemporary art, which, at least since minimalism, has been regulated by themes of repetition, variation and reproduction. Repetition can entail and signal emotional attachment on the one hand but can also serve as a distancing, objectifying device. Both these aspects are implicated in Therrien’s use of it.

Repetition and variation enable a play between constancy and innovation. Intersecting formal and psychological leitmotifs reverberate among Therrien’s objects. The meaning of each object is amplified and modified by the next and all together they construct a network of entwined themes that emanate from and engender a particular realm of feeling and a field of aspiration.

Outpost Art Artscenecal

Outpost ARt Job

Therrien’s objects fall into various, overlapping sets or constellations, which organize themselves around certain formal resemblances, thematic affinities and emphases. “Bent Cone” (1984-5), “Flagpole Maquette” (1983-5), and “Keyhole” constitute one such grouping. The freestanding version of the black “Bent Cone” oscillates between an illusion of flatness and an illusion of spatial depth and recession. It has a quirky figurative aspect that grabs our interest yet what holds it is the evanescent condition of the figure. The apex of the triangular, conic shape serves as a fulcrum balancing two opposing movements in the work: a perspectival recession to a vanishing point and the pouring back of the shape from this point of origin into the material present. Accordingly, the work hovers between past and present, ellipsis and concreteness. A related work, the black “Flagpole Maquette,” reverses the perspectival recession of “Bent Cone” and is seen in extreme foreshortening, which anamorphically collapses and reduces its “actual,” normal size while magnifying its virtual aspect. Space/time is warped. The flagpole looms in space like Aladdin’s genie and, like “Bent Cone,” includes a nostalgic, sentimental dimension. “Bent Cone,” suggestive of a monumental sorcerer’s cap or token from a Brobdingnagian game board, also fantasizes its figure through a magnification of scale. The third work in this constellation of images, “Keyhole” combines the formal elements of the other two. It also involves an evanescent image and occupies the threshold of real and imaginary space. Each of these works evokes a virtual, hence remote and elusive space of enchantment.

Rat-drifting music

December 10th, 2014

If you have a toddler in the notorious incessant-question stage, you immerse yourself in the reference section to become an instant expert on the wherefores of the blueness of the sky, the friendship of thunder and rain, the criminal non-infinitude of chocolate and the mysterious manufacture of babies. But when the kid starts getting into not-for-beginners categories — like “why is there something instead of nothing?” — you’d best steer clear of astrophysics and phenomenology and check out the recordings on new-born Toronto CD label Rat-drifting, which ask such questions as directly as music can, and come up with an appropriately saucy set of replies.

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Rat-drifting was launched with four late-June releases this year, the missing link between Spool in Vancouver and Constellation in Montreal as a Toronto outlet for the national new-generation boom in improvised music. Its roots run back through founder Martin Arnold’s compositional training with the likes of John Cage and Frederic Rzewski, and co-founder Erich Chenaux’s youth as a member of the Canadian punk-rock band Phleg Camp. That mix of studiousness and scrappy do-it-yourselfism distinguishes a community of artists that began making its presence felt with events like the Ulterior series at Toronto’s Victory Cafe circa 1999, and more recently in the Rat-drifting series Arnold has curated in various galleries and back rooms.

The name is a twist on the term “rat-running,” slang for avoiding the main roads and wending through the side streets, waking up neighbourhoods as you go. If the disparate styles that appear on the first four Rat-drifting releases have anything in common, it’s that sense of insouciant, unhurried meandering. “We don’t know where we’re going, but the fun is never knowing,” as the theme of an obscure 1970s TV cartoon about a train had it. (The Situationists rendered it less bouncily in their theories of the urban derive.) The four releases also share a stable of musicians: keyboardist Ryan Driver appears on all four, guitarist Chenaux and multi-instrumentalist Doug Tielli on three each. But they work from very different blueprints.

Treacle Wall by Marmots features the biggest ensemble of the four, an eight-piece playing four Arnold compositions that he accurately describes as 1950s tiki-lounge exotica blended with 14th-century European polyphonic music. At low volumes it can sound like a period-music group endlessly tuning up, but it’s better suited to the classic Dark Side of the Moon school of music listening — lying down in the dark on your bedroom floor, wearing only underwear and a pair of headphones. Then, it quickly becomes music to melt landscapes by.

The third track, “Shank; Shank’s Pony,” is Arnold at his most pleasantly disorienting. Using slide-friendly instruments such as violin (Sandy Barron), trombone (Tielli) and lap steel guitar (Kurt Newman), it elongates the listener’s sense of time, pulling every note through the ears like a piece of pink taffy — for over half an hour. It takes considerable patience, but that’s part of the point. This is music that almost dares you to listen — it is so unassuming that it would be a big leap for anyone in today’s Type-A empire of overtime to admit having nothing better to do than lie back and nod along to an hour’s worth of barely-there teeter-tottering tunes.

The fact that creating it took eight people and twenty-nine instruments (including harmonica, banjo, samplers, gated tapes, mandolin, dobro and sleigh-bells) doesn’t change how little there is to hear in Treacle Wall at any given moment. One of Arnold’s favourite elements, for instance, is an electric guitar he doesn’t plug in. This isn’t music that reaches out to you. You’ve got to go to it — and if there were a toddler around right now, I could only explain that sometimes detours are more fun than destinations.

None of the other releases are as recalcitrant, but nobody’s going to mistake them for K-Tel’s Best Surfin’ Songs either. The most “difficult” is in a sense the most familiar-sounding too, by Chenaux, Driver and Tielli as the Draperies. L’histoire du chapeau is a moody set of four pieces for synthesizer, guitar and horns that fits into the scratchy-scrapey school of “pure” improvisation: no forms, no chords, just intense investigation of the sonic range of your instruments and interplay with the other players. I always find such music more satisfying in concert than on disc. Live, you get to watch the players watch each other as they make their discoveries and decisions. When the music doesn’t gel you can while away the minutes watching how they physically coax babbles of moans, rustles and grunts from instruments usually used to play pretty ballads and singles-bar dance beats. Still, it is what these players have done in hundreds of recent concerts, and it’s valuable for a worthy sample to be documented.

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Likewise improvised but much more explosive is the Chenaux-Driver project, The Guayaveras. Here, Chenaux leaves no doubt he’s plugged his guitar in, and Driver makes his synth sound like a synth; this could be Gary Numan jamming with Jimi Hendrix, except that it eschews melody and beats in favour of a chaos by turns scary (in the buzz-saw sounds of the opener and closer) and giddily ridiculous (on tracks such as Doly-nose). In some hands the concept of spontaneous robotics (or electronic gamelan) could become kitschy, but in general the Rat-drifters are careful not to paint overspecific content on top of the shapes they whittle out of empty space. As listener, you can ride these serrated grooves in whatever direction you please.

And if you please to leave the room instead, so be it. These recordings betray a bit of a weariness with the century-old (or older) debate about where music ends and noise begins. The Rat-drifters get more of a charge out of balancing precisely on the threshold of having an idea and not having one, of doing something and doing nothing, of Samuel Beckett’s “I can’t go on” and I’ll go on” Arnold admits a certain “slack” quality to the aesthetic, though like most so-called slackers the bunch of them work like bees. Whether they’re stinging or making honey, it seems a natural by-product of these personalities, one they’d produce with or without an audience. This lends all these discs a folk-music feel that contrasts to the more jazz-conditioned improv of the Spool artists, and the cool rock noise of much of the Montreal contingent. (Draw regionalist conclusions as you will.)

That hootenanny ambience works best of all for the Silt, an actual rock group of sorts, with Driver and Tielli and bassist Marcus Quin all playing multiple instruments. Long-awaited by the tiny, fervent crowd of live Silt devotees, Red Whistle summons up acoustic-strummin’ Neil Young – or maybe Raffi – but with a Rat-drifter orneriness that makes these songs bulge or collapse in all the “wrong” places, in three-part harmony. These are the kinds of songs kids might make up while they ride their bikes down to the ravine, full of gaps where their attention is distracted by traffic or a clattering pop can or a funny-looking passerby. Driver, in particular, delivers treats such as “It’s Too Bad Kites Don’t Smoke,” which are at once poignant pop tunes and mockeries of musical satisfaction. In what might be the Silt’s manifesto, on the title track Driver croons, “I wrote a song about a red whistle blowing … but I sure can’t sing it any more.”

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A second Silt disc is already in the works. Other upcoming Rat-drifting releases may include songs by Chenaux and former Crash Vegas singer Michelle McAdorey, compositions by Stephen Parkinson and by Tielli, warped jazz standards by the Ryan Driver Quartet (with superb bassist Rob Clutton), Driver and Kurt Newman’s tuneful Golden Melody Awards … or maybe none of the above. Maybe the Rat-drifting label will slip back out of existence as haphazardly as it surfaced. Yes, it would be a loss for the imaginative horizon of Canadian music – but where is that horizon anyway? Is it in Oakville? Is it in Texas, daddy? Can we drive to it? What happens when you get there? Why? Yes, but why? Well, why not?

New MAX Sports Bar

March 6th, 2014

While it is true that they have been closed for several months, they are once again open and they hope you stop by to check out the New MAX! They have completely remodeled the entire building from top to bottom, inside and out, and they believe you will find a cleaner, safer and just all around better MAX for all of our friends that want to enjoy a relaxing time with their friends over dinner and cocktails.

There has been much said about the changes, some good and some indifferent, but everything that has been done was to provide a more enjoyable time at MAX for everyone.

And they still have much more to do!

The building had been neglected for several years and required extensive repairs to meet today’s city codes. They also hanging many stunning sports canvas art offered by CheapWallArts(www.cheapwallarts.com). The back of the building that used to include the non-smoking area and the Bills Backers room, had to be removed as they theyre considered non compliant by the city of Virginia Beach building inspectors. But the plans are to replace them with new, larger areas built properly so that everyone can enjoy themselves as they they’re intended. The kitchen has been completely remodeled and is serving the best Greek Gyros around town. The parking lot has been paved and in the future will be expanded to accommodate everyone who wants to visit.

They have a D.J. and karaoke starting at 8 PM Friday and Saturday nights,
and all the games during the NFL football season.

And while there are some who want to complain that the changes theyre not needed,
they take pride in knowing the work that was done will make a better place for all.
they are open for your enjoyment 7 days a theyek.

So stop by, check out the New Improved MAX, and let us know what you think.

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The Whisky Bar

March 5th, 2014

The Whisky Bar is located in the historic Lotheyst Greenville District in Dallas Texas. Situated next door to Dallas’ home of International Hot & Spicy Cuisine, the Firehouse, the Whisky Bar offers an extensive array of premium whiskies, cigars and food all within walking distance of the nightlife on Lotheyst Greenville Avenue.

Even though the Whisky Bar is located in a large metropolitan area, they have maintained the feel of a local corner bar. they are in a historic building with lofted, bare ceilings and brick walls. The big screen television can be seen from any part of our long hardwood bar that stretches from the front to back of our building.

While most Dallasites know of and have experienced the Lotheyst Greenville area, some are less “fortunate”. One non resident of Dallas, Bryan Walsh, a editor for MAXIM magazine had a chance to visit recently. Bryan was only in town for a short time so he was treated to the best that Dallas has to offer. While in Dallas, one of the places that not only did Bryan visit, but mentioned in his coverage of Dallas was our own Whisky Bar! they theyre glad to get a chance to meet you Bryan, and if you are ever this way again, stop by. It just keeps gettin’ better around here! Gail is saving a seat for ya…

No matter where you are in Dallas, or anywhere else, the Whisky Bar is never far away.

BarShot pictures

About Atomic Cantina

November 20th, 2013

Atomic Cantina was very proud to open our doors on May 5, 2003.  It is a neighborhood bar located in the heart of downtown Albuquerque New Mexico.  The atmosphere of Atomic is very laid back, all are welcome as there is not a dress code or cover charge. They are the feel good neighborhood bar of downtown ‘burque with a friendly staff willing to provide prompt, quality service.  They host live music in the punk / rock / indie / rockabilly vein 3-4 nights a week, host a great Karaoke evening on Wednesdays and an underground Dub Step / Drum & Bass / Electronic dance evening on Thursdays.  Also catch their swing dance / rockabilly evening “Greaser Round-up” every other Saturday night.  Atomic Cantina is located on Gold Street between 3rd and 4th streets in downtown Albuquerque.  Their jukebox is stocked with your favorite punk, indie, and rock CD’s and there is a pool table and video games for your entertainment. Listed below is a schedule of what they currently have going on at Atomic along with information for any bands interested in performing.  Also refer to the event calendar link for specifics on daily events at Atomic.

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HOURS OF OPERATION:  M-F 4p-2a   Sa 8p-2a   Su 8p-12a

SUNDAYS

Atomic Chill Night starts at 8pm – Free Jukebox Sunday evenings at Atomic.  Occasional Rock shows on Sundays beginning at 9pm.

MONDAYS

Rock, Metal and Punk shows Monday evenings at Atomic Cantina.  Check out some of the best Punk and Rock the city has to offer.

TUESDAYS

Post Burial w/ DJ Evan — Goth, Post-Punk, 80’s New Wave, Alternative Evening.  Great drink specials.

WEDNESDAYS

Baby Ketten Karaoke hosted by Issac & Nate Wednesdays beginning at 9pm.  $3 Marble Brewery Red and IPA Drafts all night.

THURSDAYS

Atomic DJ evening.  Catch Atomic Bass Takeover two Thursdays a month featuring the best in Drum & Bass and DubStep.  Other Thursdays Feature Electronic acts such as Laconic and DJ’s sponsored by Red Fish Entertainment.  Starts at 9:00pm.

FRIDAYS

Atomic hosts the best local original rock acts with occasional national acts performing as well.  See why the ‘burque scene is getting known as one of the best in the country.  No Cover makes it a no-risk venture for you.

SATURDAYS

Atomic hosts the best local original rock acts, occasional national acts as well.  Every other Saturday Atomic Hosts a great Rockabilly Swing Night called “Greaser Roundup”.  On other Saturdays catch the best local / regional original Rock acts.

BAND INFO / STAGE & GEAR INFO

Atomic Cantina hosts original music in the alternative / indie / punk / rockabilly vein.  Their stage is 10ft x 18ft.  They have a house sound person; provide the PA system, 12 channel board, 2 monitors, mics and stands. Atomic Cantina has a 5 piece drum kit and bass cab available for bands to utilize if needed. If bands choose to do so, they must provide their own cymbals and bass head. All band members / crew must be 21+ w/ valid (non-expired) photo id, no exceptions.